Peter Marino

Peter Marino

Peter Marino

With a look of Village People, Peter Marino is one charismatic man. He is probably the most sought-after man in the luxury world, a genuine titan of décor. Dressed in leather from head to toe, the eulogist of design has signed projects for Bernard Arnault (CEO of LVMH), Alain Wertheimer (co-owner of Chanel), to name a few of the prestigious projects he has carried out. An accomplished aesthete and a specialist of decorative arts, Peter Marino has led large-scale projects since 1978. The young architecture graduate from Cornell made his debut in the leading New York architecture firms in the 1970s, joined the Warhol band and little by little gained recognition.
Then, it was with his team of one hundred and fifty employees that he took on challenges all over the world, namely many private residences. Over the course of his thirty-five-year career, he worked for Andy Warhol, the Bergé-Saint Laurent duo, Marella Agnelli, Armani, Valentino, the wealthiest American, and now Asian fortunes. He became the absolute reference in designing luxury boutiques. Transforming the lighting of a handbag into a performance, turning a dressing room into an art gallery, that is just the talent of Peter Marino. As for his style of commercial architecture, it is not so much defined as decoration but rather a journey. Some testimonials of his work include the Dior boutique on Avenue Montaigne in 1994, Chanel boutiques, the Louis Vuitton house in Singapore, and his first notorious challenge, the Barneys department store in New York. Yves Saint Laurent bathrooms, Mrs. Agnelli’s living room and the Chanel owner’s library are just a few of his references. Marino’s style is resolutely chic, monumental and grandiose to say the least! He worked for Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, as well as Giorgio Armani and Carla Fendi, and Isetan in Tokyo. His creed is to adorn his spaces with strong and bold pieces, and he has commissioned contemporary artists to produce incredible pieces, such as the glass pearl necklaces by Jean-Michel Othoniel, the lightless elevator by Olafur Eliasson in the Louis Vuitton building at the Champs-Élysées in Paris, and the tailor-made furniture made by exceptional craftsmen such as Christophe Côme and his splendid flock-lined interiors. An art aficionado, he scoured galleries and exhibits on a quest for talented artists, a pledge of interiors punctuated with extraordinary originality.